The E-axes Forum on Climate Change, Macroeconomics, and Finance

Publications

Olivier Darmouni (Columbia Business School) and Yuqi Zhang (Columbia Business School) who owns brown coal power plants, the single largest source of carbon emissions globally? They conduct a new study that shows while ownership by stock market investors is on the decline, private and especially state investors have grown significantly, slowing down the phase-out of fossil fuels....
Incomplete markets and uncorrected environmental externalities result in the under-provision of low-carbon technologies. In her paper “Bringing breakthrough technologies to market: solar power and feed-in tariffs” , Sugandha Srivastav (University of Oxford) examines whether the United Kingdom’s renewable energy feed-in-tariff (FiT), which is a risk-reduction and price instrument, helped bring utility-scale solar energy to market.
Jans Starmans (Stockholm School of Economics) explores how socially responsible investors can have an impact in a timely manner. He examines whether firm owners with high negative environmental externalities are incentivized to reduce these externalities proactively if they anticipate their firm to be bought by socially responsible investors.
Mayank Kumar (University of Michigan) argues in his paper "Getting Dirty Before You Get Clean: Institutional Investment in Fossil Fuels and the Green Transition" that private investment in fossil fuel companies does not adversely affect climate outcomes but rather it can support the green transition by financing clean technologies. Specifically, the paper studies the effects of PE investment in fossil fuel on solar energy technologies.
Charles A. Taylor (Harvard Business School) and Marco Tabellini (Harvard Business School) introduce the concept of “climate matching” as a driver of migration and establish several new results. They show that climate strongly predicts the spatial distribution of immigrants in the US, as movers select destinations with climates similar to their place of origin.
Historically, central banks and other financial policymakers have played far larger roles in supporting structural economic transformations through the use of credit policies. In this Digest, Katie Kedward (UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose) reflects upon the potential relevance of credit policies to support the green transition.
Jens van't Klooster (University of Amsterdam) and Eric Monnet (Paris School of Economics and CEPR) look at how tight monetary policy impacts low-carbon investments. Most importantly, they suggest green credit policy instruments, central banks can use, that will enable them to address inflationary pressures without jeopardizing the long-term decarbonization of the economy.
Understanding the linkages between climate vulnerability and sovereign debt risk is pivotal for countries that want to step up their climate mitigation strategies. Bhavya Gupta (National University of Singapore) and Ramkishen S. Rajan (National University of Singapore) have curated the most recent theoretical and empirical literature on the effects of climate on sovereign debt risk.
In this brief, we ask whether the implementation of national climate policies may spur a global race to protectionism. Consumer or production subsidies and border carbon adjustments may have positive mitigation effects but can also generate trade distortions and give national industries a competitive advantage against foreign firms.
The recent experience with surging inflation, partly driven by supply shocks to the energy sector, has ampiflied concerns over "greenflation," inflationary pressures resulting from the transition to sustainable energy sources. For this digest Conny Olovsson (ECB and Sveriges Riksbank) and David Vestin (Sveriges Riksbank) have curated the most recent literature on the theoretical and empirical findings on how greenflation arises and what central banks can do to curb it. They, and the papers they have chosen, highlight the central role for foresighted monetary policy as well as a smooth carbon taxation path.

Upload Research

  • Accepted file types: pdf, Max. file size: 50 MB.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Donate Now